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ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



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VOL. 33 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1936 

FEATURE ARTICLE 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA 
(Page 351) 



NO. 12 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Page 

Recent wheat and rye production estimates 341 

Chinese cotton production high 342 

Indian cotton acreage above 1935-36 344 

France grants United States special orange import quota 345 

Smaller date crops in prospect 345 

Germany maintains total fat supplies 346 

Uruguay cattle slaughter declines 347 

British wool market values continue strong 347 

New Zealand Government controls dairy exports 348 



340 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
LATE CABLES 



Vol. 33, No. 1'2 



Australian wheat harvest somewhat late in Western and 
South Australia "but the crop appears healthy and a satisfactory 
outturn is expected if rains are received. Crop condition re- 
ported good in New South Wales and Victoria hut high winds 
caused some damage in the central part of latter state. (Inter- 
national Institute of Agricalture, Rome, September 16, 1935.) 

Poland provisional estimates of 1936 croos reported as 
follows, with 1935 comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 77,896,000 
"bushels (73,884,000), rye 251,560,000 (260, 498, 000) , barley 
67,057,000 (67,440,000), oats 181,191,000 (178,981,000), potatoes 
1,178,359,000 "bushels (1,194,222,000). (International Institute 
of Agriculture, Rome, September 17, 1936.) 

Smyrna distr ict reports heavy rains September 7 and 10 
causing considerable fall of raisins. Majority of crop was 
under cover and while previously estimated crop of 78,000 short 
tons may not he quite reached, the greatest damage was in reduc- 
tion of quality .of exposed raisins. Eigs likewise damaged with 
production of edible quality now estimated at 30,000 short tons. 
(Agri cult-oral Attachd IT. I. Nielsen, Paris, September 18, 1936.) 

London wool sales continue with general tone of market 
good. Withdrawals have been light. Opening rates of prices 
have been fully maintained. (See page 347.) Yorkshire furnished 
chief buyers of- -.most types, with those from the Continent buying 
very moderately. (Agricultural Attache C C. Taylor, London, 
September 18, 1936. ) 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS 



341 



BREAD GRAINS 

S ummary of recent information 

Estimates of the 1936 wheat crop, as reported for 37 countries, now 
total 2,937,884,000 bushels, a reduction of over 5 percent from the combined 
production of these countries in 1935, when they accounted for about 87 per- 
cent of the estimated world total, excluding China and Russia. The first 
official estimate for Canada was the lowest on record since 1919, when the 
area sown amounted to only about 75 percent of the acreage reported for 1936. 
The United States outturn was officially reported at 630,241,000 bushels, 
a reduction of over 2,000,000 bushels from the August estimate but a gain of 
nearly 7,000,000 bushels over the crop of 1935. A marked decrease is indicat 
fpr Czephoslovakia, the' new harvest having been placed about 13 percent under 
the 1935 crop. The Polish crop is expected to e^iceod that of last year, but 
recent unfavorable conditions make earlier expectations somewhat doubtful.. 

Current changes in production estimates of wheat and rye 



Commodity and country 



Reported up to 
Sept. 8. 1936 



Reported up to 
S ept. 21. 1936 



1935 



Whea t I 

37 countries reported j 

United States j 

Canada J 

Poland ; 

United Kingdom ; 

Czechoslovakia i 

Denmark \ 

Sweden , ^ 

Austria .; 

Lithuania .; 

37 countries reported ....J 

: 

16 countries reported 

Canada 

Czechoslovakia i 

Sweden , .; 

Switzerland .j 

19 countries reported 



1,000 bushels 

2,926,289 
632,745 
aj 210 , 000 
b / 77 , 200 
58,000 
60,626 
13,600 
22,000 
14,700 
8,800 



513,174 
d/ 4,046 



1.000 bushels 



630,241 
232,973 
77,895 
57,000 
54,049 
12,900 
22,707 
13,200 
8,300 
2,937,884 



c/ 



4,982 
54,918 
14,763 

1,110 
584,901 



1,000 bushels 



623,444 
277,339 
73 , 884 
65,397 
62,095 
14, 672 
23,611 
15,590 
10,093 
3,103,337 



9,606 
64,501 
17,116 

1,279 
619 , 704 



a/ Unofficial, b/ Estimate of the Berlin office, Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics, c/ Based on official estimates for England, Wales, and Scotland, 
d/ Winter wheat only. 



342 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Wo. 12 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



Rye estimates for 19 countries reporting amount to 584,901,000 "bush- 
els as against 619,704,000 "bushels reported by the same countries in 1935. 
All recent figures for 1936 are considerably under the respective harvests 
of 1935. The first official estimate for Czechoslovakia, which produces 
an important part of the European crop, indicates a 15-percent decrease 
from the 1935 production, while Sweden reports a reduction of 14 percent. 

Th e Shanghai wheat market 

Arrivals of domestic wheat at Shanghai continued in good volume dur- 
ing the ?/eek ended September 11, according to a radiogram from the Shanghai 
office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The mills were active, but 
it appeared likely that operations would be curtailed if the demand for flour 
did not soon improve. Fneat supplies were considered sufficient for normal 
operation until December. Stocks of flour were accumulating. 

There was little change in the spot price of the best-quality domestic 
wheat, which was quoted on the Shanghai market at 81 cents per bushel. 
Futures prices at noon on September 11 were as follows: September 80 cents, 
October 82, November 83, December 85, January 87 cents. Australian whea,t 
was nominally quoted at shout 119 c^nts per bushel, but the trade was only- 
interested in whes.t that co\ild be purchased at around 85 cents. Flour fu- 
tures were as follows: September 93 cents per bag of 49 pounds, October 94, 
November 95, December 97, January 98 cents. Australian flour, c.i.f. Hong 
Kong, was $4.41 per barrel of 196 pounds. 



COTTON 

Chi nese cotton produ ctio n high 

The China cotton situation is characterized by the prospect of a 
record crop and the possibility of exporting 400,000 bales during the coming 
season, according to cabled information from Agricultural Commissioner 0. L. 
Dawson at Shanghai. Another factor affecting the situation is the expected 
increase in domestic consumption of yarn and piece goods due to improved 
economic conditions. Prices of foreign cotton are considerably above those 
of native cotton with demand for the former expected to stay at a minimum 
during the coming year. For the first time, however, a quantity of Brazilian 
cotton has been shipped for the use of Shanghai mills. 

The total cotton crop, based on reports received from all principal 
producing regions, is now estimated at 3,650,000 bales of 500 pounds, com- 
pared with 2,600,000 bales in 1935. Although the climatic conditions in 
August were not entirely favorable for cotton growing in the Yangtze Valley, 



■September 21, 1936 

CROP AND 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
MARKET PROSPECTS, CON T'D 



343 



on the whole, the crop is expected to "be materially larger than that of a 
year ago. In North China the weather has been sufficiently favorable to 
assure a larger crop; in certain parts of the northwest the size of the crop 
will depend upon the weather during the forthcoming 3 weeks.. Should the 
climatic conditions turn definitely unfavorable the above estimate might be 
lowered, but with exceptionally favorable weather a small increase is possible. 

Shipments of new crop cotton to Japan will be dependent upon a decline 
in prices in relation to Indian cotton. If this decline should fail to take 

place before the new crop of Indian cotton becomes available, purchases of 
Chinese cotton will be restricted until its price is forced down to a level 

where it can compete with Indian. 

During the month of July, China imported a total of 8,293 bales as 
against 15,383 bales in June. The imports of American cotton were 731 and 
2,885 bales, respectively. Total imports of foreign cotton during October- 
July 1936 were 159, _24 bales compared with 250,692 bales for a similar period 
a year earlier. Imports of American cotton in these totals decreased from 
124,921 bales in 1935 to 49,343 bales in 1936. On the other hand, imports 
of other growths of cotton have not only held their own but managed to show 
increases over the preceding year, A shipment of about 10,000 bales of 
Brazilian cotton is reported on its way to Shanghai. Brazilian cotton is 
_now at least 30 points cheaper than American, giving due allowance for dif- 
ference in quality, but when the above purchases were made the difference 
was somewhat greater. Only small amounts of Indian cotton are due to arrive. 

The prices of Indian, American, -and domestic cotton showed increases 
over the preceding month of 1.65, 1.56, and .74 cents, respectively. Yarn 
prices in China have now moved into a more favorable position with relation 
to raw cotton prices than has existed for some time, as illustrated by the 
price quotation of 14,44 cents per pound. Eoth yarn and piece goods sales 
have improved and this is attributed to more stable economic conditions in 
the country. 



CHINA: Price per pound of specified grades of cotton at Shanghai, 



September 12, 1936 


, with comparisons 




Growth 


1936 


August 12 


September 12 




Cents 


Cent s 




11.30 


10.56 




9.92 


10.66 


American middling (immediate delivery) 


14.43 


15.99 




11,29 


12.94 







344 Foreign Crops arid Markets Vol. 33, No. 12 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CO NT ! D 



CHINA: Imports of raw cotton in July 1936, with, comparisons 



Growth 


1936 


0c toher-July 


' June 


July 


' 1934-35 


; 1935-35 




: Bales 


: Bales 


Bales 


j Bales 


American 


: 2,855 


: 731 


124,921 


• 49,343 


Indian 


: 8,173 


j 2,149 


97,621 


■ 83,455 


Egyptian 


3,247 


i 4,296 


26 , 224 


j 23,944 


Others 


; 1,078 


: 1,117 


1,926 


j 2,882 


Total 


i 15,353 


; 8,293 


250,692 


| 159,524 


CHINA: Preliminary arrivals 


of raw cotton in August 1936, with comparis 


(in hales of 500 pounds) 






Growth 


1936 


October 


- August 


July 


August 


1934-35 


1935-36 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


American • 


2,505 


300 


121,919 


44,221 


Indian 


2,720 j 


3,260 


84,471 


73,641 


Chinese | 


41,867 j 


34,862 


690,735 i 


1,105,787 


Egyptian • 


3,298 : 


1,646 


24,251 I 


23,424 
18,285 


Others j 


1,398 i 


4.940 


4.497 : 


Total i 


51,788 i 


44,608 


925,873 : 


1,255,358 



CHINA: Cotton deliveries to Shanghai mills in July 1936, with comparisons 



Growth 








Octoher 


- Augast 




July 


; August 


1934-35 


. 1935-35 








Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


American 






1,000 


; 3 , 000 


138,000 


54,000 


Indian 






4,000 


'5,000 


92,000 


74, 000 


Chinese 






58 , 000 


40, 000 


618,000 


1,095,000 


Egyptian 




■ • • 


3,000 


2,000 


24,000 


25,000 


Others 




• • • 


3,000 


3, 000 


6,000 


16,000 


Total 






69,000 


53,000 


878,000] 


1,265,000 



Indian cotton acreage ahove last year 

The first official estimate of the 1936-37 Indian cotton acreage, 
released August 17 gives the area under the following trade descriptions, 
compared with the first estimate last year, according to a report from 
P. K. Norris, Agricultural Commissioner at Bombay. 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 345 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



INDIA: First estimate of cotton acreage, 1935-36 and 1936-3" 





1935-36 


1936-37 


Percentage 1936-37 




is of 1935-36 




■ Thousand acres 


Thousand acres 


Percent 




: 8,936 


8,732 


97.7 




2,899 


:•• 3,316 


114.4 




947 


: 1,930 


203.8 


Others > 


1.712 


1,791 


104.6 


Total ' 


14,494 


15,769 


108.8 



The increase in Bengal and American cottons occurred largely in the 
irrigated sections of the Punjab and Sind provinces. The effort to increase 
American types outside of the irrigated areas of these tv/o provinces has met 
with little success. Weather conditions have not been particularly favor- 
able. The monsoon has been poor in many sections and the crop is suffering 
because of dry weather. This is a serious factor and may result in a 
decreased estimate in October. 



FRUIT, "VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 

France grants United Sta te s special orange quota 

A special orange quota of 36,000 metric quintals was granted the 
United States by France on September 12, according to a cable from Acting 
Commercial Attache D. J. Reagan at Paris. Licenses for importation under 
the quota were to be issued immediately. The licenses are good for 150 days. 
The special quota is equal to about 102,000 boxes of oranges. It will be 
recalled that France granted the United States a special quota of 100,000 
metric quintals, or 283,000 boxes, in June. 



Smaller date cr ops in prospect 

Smaller crops of dates are expected this year in both Iraq and 
Algeria and reports from Iran (Persia) point to somewhat smaller production 
in that country than last year, according to a report from Assistant Agri- 
cultural Attache* Mallory at Paris. Exports from Iraq are not expected to 
reach the 163,539 short tons shipped during the year ended March 31, 1936. 
Opening prices are expected to be below those of last year but it is likely 
that there will be a smaller decline than usual during the season. Less 



346 Foreign Crops and Markets 

cnp and m arks "t pans ? e c t s, 



Vol. 33, No. 12 

G 0 N T'D 



definite information is available from Iran "but conditions are said to be 
similar to those reported for Iraq. A crop "below the large production of 
last year is expected in Algeria. In that year, 142,450 short tons were 
produced. The quality of the Algerian crop will "be excellent providing dry 
weather prevails until harvest . 



LIVESTOCK', MEAT , ANT) WO^L 

Germany maintains total fat supplies 

Edible fats have "been available in Germany in fairly satisfactory 
quantities during the past summer, according to Agricultural Commissioner 
E. E. Reed at Berlin. There was a seasonal increase in domestic "butter 
production, an increased production of domestic lard in the period April- 
June, and larger imports of both butter and lard in the first half of the 
year. The fixed prices at which butter and lard are sold, however, have 
been fairly high. 

The reduced margarine production, however, has been below require- 
ments, and at present margarine appears to be the weakest point in the 
German fat supply situation. The maintenance of margarine production dur- 
ing the corning winter at last year's levels appears unlikely, unless ar- 
rangements can be made to obtain larger imports of raw materials. In view 
of the foreign exchange situation and limited opportunity to obtain oil- 
seeds under barter and similar agreements, such arrangements will be dif- 
ficult to make. 

Some reduction in domestic butter production is seen for the coming 
winter, but a marked increase in domestic lard production is anticipated, 
Mr. Reed states. The latter point is related (l) to the marked upturn in 
German hog numbers and (2) the delayed marketings of hogs. In view of the 
regulations prohibiting the marketing of hogs weighing less than 180 pounds, 
a delayed harvest this year has resulted in substantial farm accumulations 
of unfinished hogs awaiting new supplies of feed. 

The seasonal' decline in hog receipts was sharper than usual this 
summer as it became evident that the delayed harvest was going to retard 
the finishing of marketable hogs. Eor the first 3 weeks in August, market- 
ings were smaller than for the same weeks of last year when the 1935 hog 
shortage was so acute. This year's marketing regulations, however, have 
resulted in a much better distribution than last year of the supplies avail- 
able. It now appears that marketings during the late autumn and early winte 
will be unusually large for that period, and may either force some readjust- 
ment of the relatively high fixed prices, or result in extensive government 
purchases . 



September: 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



347 



CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



Uruguay cattle slaughter declin es 



Cattle slaughter in Uruguay for the first 7 months of 1936, at 570,000 
head, was 15.4 percent smaller than the comparable 1935 slaughter, according 
to Consul General L. E. Reed at Montevideo. Except in February, the monthly 
slaughter this year has been smaller than that of last year, and the trend 
has been downward since April. Last year the seasonal downturn did not ap- 
pear until June. In recent yea.rs, Uruguay has been furnishing more than half 
of the canned beef imported into the United States. Imports from Uruguay 
in the first half of 1936 amounted to 28,743,000 pounds against 2,294,000 
pounds in the January-June period of 1935. See table, page 365, for monthly 
figures on slaughter of cattle and other livestock in 1935 and 1936. 

B ritish wool market va lues conti nue str ong 

Prices at the London wool sales which opened on September 15 were gen- 
erally from 5 to 10 percent higher 'than at the close of the preceding series 
on July 17, according to cabled advices from Agricultural Attache C- C. Taylor 
at London. The tone of the sales reflects the firm wool trade conditions 
noted in Great Britain in recent weeks. The strength exhibited' at recent 
sales in primary markets also is reflected in the London values. 

Yorkshire has been an outstanding buyer at London sales, particularly 
in crossbred wool. There has been a noticeably strong British interest in 
recent weeks in the lower grades of crossbreds. At Brisbane, saJ.es opened 
on September 14 with competition keen for an average selection of wool. 
Prices were firmly in line with closing rates of September 10 at Sydney. 
Yorkshire and Germany were the chief buyers at Brisbane, with Prance provid- 
ing some support. 

The low level of spot wool supplies in Great Britain has been an 
important reason for the current interest in new supplies at recent sales. 
The firm raw materials position also has resulted in a more confident at- 
titude toward future values on the part of manufacturers. The greater 
British utilization of wool this year to date has reduced British stocks 
to an unusually low level, and producing countries have not been in a posi- 
tion to maintain supplies of all grades. 

Imports of merino wool in the first half of 1936 were 5 percent below 
the 1935 figures. Reduced receipts from Australia accounted for most of 
the decline. In crossbreds, imports this year were 14 percent higher than in 
the first 6 months of 1935, with most of the gain accounted for by imports 
from New Zealand. Total imports of merino wool this year reached 270,968,000 
pounds, with imports of crossbred wool totaling 270,305,000 pounds. 



348 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 12 



CROP AND MARKET PROSPECT S, CONT'D 



British- grown wool also has met with an improved market this season, 
according to Consul E. E. Evans at Bradford. There has "been active competi- 
tion for such wool at country fairs, especially on the part of exporters. 
Prices have "been regarded as being somewhat out of line with prices procur- 
able by domestic spinners, especially earlier in the season. More recent 
advices have been to the effect that semi-manufactured wool and fabrics have 
"been moving at prices more in line with wool replacement costs. Meanwhile, 
export firms have given good support to the prices prevailing for domestic 
wools . 



NEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT CONTROLS DAIRY EXPORTS 

Effective August 1, 1936, the New Zealand government assumed complete 
control of butter and cheese exports from that country, according to Consul 
General G. A. Bucklin at Wellington. On the basis of a scale of fixed 
prices to producers, announced earlier, all "butter and cheese entering ex- 
port trade "becomes the property of the government when placed on board ex- 
port vessels. Since exports account for the "bulk of production in New 
Zealand, this action represents practical control of the New Zealand dairy 
industry as far as sales are concerned. 

According to a parliamentary statement on the new plan, the base 
prices announced for the season Augdst 1 - July 31, 1936-37, are fixed so as 
to ins-ore farmers of a return on butterfat at least equal to the average 
returns of the past 10 years, plus an allowance for increased costs in the 
industry. It was stated also that if export sales are not made at figures 
high enough to cover the guaranteed price to producers the ensuing deficit 
is to be met by the Government. On the other hand, if returns are greater 
than the guaranteed price, the surplus is to be devoted to the benefit of 
the industry after consultation with its representatives. 

The first season's basic prices f.o.b. ship per hundredweight of 112 
pounds were set as follows: (a) Einest grade creamery butter scoring 93 
or 33.5 points, 117s. 3d. (21.1 cents per pound); (b) first grade whey butter 
scoring 88 points and over, 107s. lid. (19.4 cents per pound); first grade 
cheese scoring 92 or 92.5 points, 63s. 7d. (11.4 cents per pound). The same 
parliamentary statement announced that in succeeding seasons, factors other 
than former average returns would "be considered in setting the basic price. 
These factors include cost of production, the standard of living of the 
farmer as compared with other sections of the community, and the stability 
of the industry. 

The information available gives no indications as to what may be done 
to keep butter and cheese production in line with the probable government 



September 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



349 



HEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT CONTROLS DAIRY EXPORTS , ■ CONT'D 



purchases for export , plus domestic market' requirements* Since the Govern- 
ment does not offer to. 'buy all butter and cheese produced at the guaranteed 
price, however, it is reasonable to assume that producers will not ran the 
risk of the excessively . low domestic prices which might result from produc- 
ing beyond the current needs, of the export and domestic markets. This prob-* 
ability is strengthened by the fact that the guaranteed prices themselves 
are regarded by a number- of important producing units as being too low. 

The 1936-37 butter season opened on August -1 in New Zealand- with 
production running below that of the two preceding- seasons . ■ • Grading s of 
butter for the period August 1 - September 4, at 17, 265, 000- pounds, were 
9 percent under the comparable 1935 figures, and were slightly smaller than 
in 1934. For the season closed July 31, 1935, however, total gradings were 
8 percent larger than in 1934-35, and 4.5 percent ' above the 1933-34 figures. 
See table on following page. New Zealand butter was being, quoted in London 
on September 10, 1936 at 24.7 cents per pound. -On. the same date, 92. score 
butter in New York was quoted at 36 cents. The United States import duty 
on butter is 14 cents per pound. ■ 

BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and London ^ 
September 17, 1936, with comparisons 



Market and description 



1936 



1935 



September 10 


September 17 


September 19 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


36.0 .. 


, . 35.0 


; 25.8 


37.0 


37.0 


28.0 


23.2 


•22.4 ■ 


■ ■ • 22.9 


28 .9 ■ ' ' 


• ■ ' 28.0 


■ 28.4 


24.7 


23.8 


•24.5 


23.2 ' • 


22.8 


• 23.0 


23.5 , . 


a/ 


• a/ 


23.7 


23.2 


21.7 



New York, 92 score 

San Francisco, 92 score 

Copenhagen, official quotation 
London: 

Danish 

New Zealand 

Dutch 

Estonian 

Siberian 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange, a/ No quotation. 

New Zealand farmers have been interested for a number of years in 
securing some official action designed to mitigate the hazards of price 
fluctuations. The proposal to guarantee prices became a prominent issue in 
the New Zealand parliamentary elections of November 1935, when a heavy Labor 
Party majority was returned. The new Government began drafting plans for 
applying the guarantee principle first to butter and cheese'.' Various propo- 
sals were considered which would relieve the Government of direct participa- 
tion in the commercial handling of the products exported. The announced plan 
and organization, however, indicates that the objective was regarded as un- 
attainable without direct government action. 



350 foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 12 

HEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT CONTROLS DAISY EXPORTS , CONT'D 



BUTTER: New. Zealand grading, 19.35-36 season to September 4, 
_________ with c om pari sons ■ 



Date .. . . ; ..; 


1933-34 


1934-35 


1935-36 








1,000 pounds 


1,000 pounds • 


1,000 pounds 


Total August 1 to March 


27 




269 ,293 


250 , 671 i 


275,060 


Week ended 












April 3 






6,216 


5,712 


6,440 


10. 






4,928 


5 , 768 


5, 600 


If • 






4,480 


4,558 


5 , 656 


24 






3,472 


4, 760 


4,704 


April total 






19,096 


20,798 


22,400 


May i 






3, .304 


4,480 


4,704 


o 

o 








3 , 69 6 


6 , oo4 


-L<J • 






2 , 240 


2, 856 


2, 9o8 


<d<d 






"1 CCA 

1 j, bou 


2 , o rb 


n one 

2, 2yb 


29 






-L , ^1<J 


c , UJ.0 




May total 






11,368 


15 , 624 


15,792 








1,064 


1,512 


1 ,456 


12 






896 


: 1,176 


1,120 


19 








; ojD 




26 






560 


: 728 


224 


June total • 






3,080 


j 4,312 


3,808 


July 3 






616 


\ 806 


5bU 


10 






672 


728 


516 


17 






853 


; 1,036 


616 


24 






1,058 


: 1 S 0S4. 


1.064 


31 






1, 650 


: 1,926 


1 . 551 


July total 






/l QQ A 

4, tsy4 


; 5,5 DO 




Total 1935-36 






307,731 


i 296,965 


321,277 


August 7 






! 2,212 


i 2,419 


; 2,016 


14 .. 






I 2,912 


i 3,898 


1 2,811 


21 ... 






. . • .. : 3,640 


; 3,864 


i 3,366 


28 , 






', . - -4,088 


4,536 


• 4 , 032 


August total 






12,852 


j 14,717 


• 12,225 


September 4 






4,733 


;. 4,368 


■ 5,040 


Total August 1 to Sept. 


4 




; 17,590 


j 19,085 


17,265 


Agricultural Attache C. 


C. 


Taylor, London. 







September 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



351 



PROGRESS OP AGRICULTURAL TRADE wTTH CANADA aj 

The United States agricultural exports to Canada on which Canadian 
duties were reduced under the United States-Canadian Reciprocal Trade 
Agreement were valued at $13,120,000 during the first 7 months of 1936, 
while the imports of Canadian agricultural products on which United 
States duties were reduced under the agreement amounted to $11,409,000. 
The former figure represented 45 percent of all United States agricul- 
tural exports to Canada during this period, while the latter represented 
25 percent of the imports of all agricultural products from Canada, 

The value of United States agricultural exports to Canada during 
July 1936 was only slightly higher than that for the same month of 1935. 
There was a rise of 48 percent, however, in that part of those exports 
on which Canadian duties were reduced under the trade agreement. This 
was nearly offset by a decrease of 27 percent in our other agricultural 
shipments to Canada. During July there was an upward movement in the 
United States prices of many agricultural items exported to Canada. 
Most of this upward movement resulted from drought losses experienced 
during the past summer. There has been also some increase in domestic 
consumer demand for many of our farm products. The foregoing figures, 
however, suggest that the concessions secured from Canada have tended 
to maintain a flow of the items so affected. The figures on the volume 
of exports of concession items also point to this conclusion. 

The July import record shows that the total value of agricultural 
imports from Canada was considerably larger than the July 1935 value, 
and that the value of imports of concession items increased to an even 
greater extent. The advancing American prices undoubtedly accounted 
for much of the increase over the July 1935 values. In some items the 
value of imports increased even though the volume was below that of last 
year, .among the important concession items, imports of Cheddar cheese, 
poultry, maple sugar, and hay all increased substantially in volume and 
value over 1935 levels. Cattle imports decreased sharply in July, but 
were still larger than those of a year ago. 

a/ Heretofore, the record of the trade with Canada under the agreement 
has been treated in two separate issues each month. The first article 
commented upon the volume of trade in certain outstanding agricultural 
products. The second article summarized the value of all trade with 
Canada, with special emphasis on concession and non-concession agricul- 
tural items. This issue is the first to carry an article combining the 
two formerly published independently. The tabulations will continue to 
include all of the concession items carried in earlier articles. Begin- 
ning with the present issue, these statements on trade with Canada will 
be available in separate form. 



352 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 12 



PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA , CONT'D 

Exports 

Outstanding contributions to the larger agricultural exports to 
Canada In July were developed in prok products. Exports of hams were larger 
than in June, and were about 2.5 times as large as the July 1935 exports. 
The July movement of pickled pork to Canada was more than four times as 
large as the June movement and almost ten times as large as the July 1935 
figures. On lard, also, gains were registered with figures many times larger 
than those of the 2 comparable months. The July exports extended the advance 
in pork products over last year recorded so far for 1936, with 7-months'. 
figures for ham more than three times as large as the 1935 total; pickled 
pork exports were about four times, and lard exports nearly twice as large as 
last year's comparable figures. 

Among the important fresh fruit exports to Canada, both grapefruit 
and oranges moved in July at levels somewhat under those of last year. The 
decline, however, was not great enough to offset the advances established 
over the 1935 figures for the year. Seven-months' exports of grapefruit 
for" 1936 were 10 percent larger than in 1935, with exports of oranges ahead 
of 1935 figures by 11 percent. 

In apples, there was an increase in July exports over June, but the 
current figures were about the same as those of July 1935. So far this year, 
exports of apples to Canada have run nearly 2.5 times the 1935 volume. Ex- 
port's of nuts also have increased substantially over those of last year. 
The heavy July movement of pecans made the 7-months' exports of that item 
more than 10 times as large as the comparable 1935 exports. 

The recovery in July of exports of the leading dried-fruit items 
placed the year's exports of all of those items ahead of the comparable 1935 
totals. Exports of all three dried items in July were larger than in June, 
and from two to three times as large as the July 1935 figures. As a result, 
exports of dried pears to Canada this year show an increase of 5 percent over 
those of the first 7 months of 1935, and in dried peaches the advance over 
1935 exports amounted to 2 percent. This year's exports of. dried apricots 
are now something more than twice as large as the comparable 1935 movement. 
In canned fruit, exports of apricots moved down slightly from the high June 
level. The heavy increase for July over figures for a year earlier, how- 
ever, kept this year's total well in advance of 1935. Canned peaches more 
than held their own during July, and there was another heavy increase in ex- 
ports of pineapples. 

The July export figures for rice continued the downward movement in 
that commodity. Exports of milled rice amounted to only about one-ninth of 
the June 1936 figures and represented a much smaller fraction of the July 
1935 exports. There were no exports of rough rice in July. Dry beans moved 
in good volume in that month, the figures being about three times as large 
as in July 1935. The increase, however, left the 7-months' total still 



September 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



353 



PROGRESS •' OT AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 

37 percent under the comparable 1935 exports. Corn exports in July also 
advanced sharply over last year's movement to make a 7-months ' total more 
than three times as large as in 1935. 

Seasonal conditions were important in reducing the July exports of 
shell eggs to Canada considerably "below the June level. The current figures, 
however, were substantially larger than those of a year earlier, and exports 
for the first 7 months of this year are more than six times as large as in 
1935. In live poultry, also, July figures showed another good gain over 
last year's movement. In dressed poultry, the July exports to Canada repre- 
sented an increase over June figures. The July exports, however, were not 
as large as those of a year earlier. 

Imports 

Preliminary figures for August indicate that total imports of quota 
cattle in that month amounted to about 6,000 head, the smallest for any 
month so far this year. The current figure compares with 9,911 head imported 
in July and with the peak figure of 37,694 received in April. By August 29, 
the 1936 quota for cattle, excluding dairy cows, and weighing 700 pounds or 
more admitted at a reduced rate of duty, was 92 percent utilized, with Canadiar. 
cattle accounting for 86 percent of the quota imports. The quota for veal 
calves weighing under 175 pounds was exhausted by August 8. The quota for 
dairy cows weighing 700 pounds or more was 20 percent utilized by August 29. 

The continued decline in imports of heavy cattle (700 pounds or over), 
excluding dairy cows, from Canada resulted in a July figure 58.5 percent small e 
than the June imports and more than 75 percent under the larger imports re- 
corded for April. Current figures, however, continue to exceed those of a 
year ago. 

The July imports of veal calves from Canada were sustained at the rel- 
atively high levels reached in June. Toward the end of July it became 
evident that the low-duty quota for that class of cattle would be exhausted 
relatively soon, a fact which probably prompted much of the comparatively 
large movement for the month. It is anticipated that August figures for 
calves will be smaller than in July, since the regular duty of 2.5 cents 
per pound went into effect when the quota was filled early in the month. 

The increased imports of heavy cattle from Mexico in July, although 
double the small June figures, were not sufficiently large to offset the 
heavy decline in receipts from Canada. Mexico also sent more calves in 
July than in June. In non-quota (175-700 pound) cattle, however, the July 
decline in imports from both Canada and Mexico kept total imports of light 
cattle (under 700 pounds) below the June level, although still above such 
imports for July 1935. 

In cheddar cheese, the July imports, at 1,814,000 pounds, were the 
largest of any month this year. The current figure also was more than twice 



354 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 12 



PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 

as large as the average July imports in the 1925-1929 period. Domestic pro- 
duction in July, while smaller than in June or a year ago, was the third lar- 
gest for July on record. Prices, however, have remained firm, and at present 
are about 25 percent higher than at this time last year. For the first 7 
months of 1936, imports of cheddar cheese from Canada represented about 1.9 
percent of domestic production for the same period. Average imports for the 
same months in 1925-1929, when the duty was the same as at present, represent 
1.5 percent of the corresponding average domestic production. 

Imports of certified seed potatoes in July experienced the usual 
seasonal decline, amounting to only 25 "bushels. The quota for low-duty cer- 
tified seed potatoes has been about 50 percent utilized. Imports of table 
potatoes also declined in July, although they were considerably larger than 
in July 1935. The higher 1936 prices in the United States have attracted 
about 60 percent more Canadian table potatoes this year than last. Canadian 
prices, however, also have been maintained at levels considerably higher 
than those of a year ago. Recent advices indicate that potatoes from the 
Maritime Provinces have been moving westward freely in recent weeks, espe- 
cially to Ontario, without indications of any weakening of prices. 

The movement of Canadian fluid cream to the United States also fell 
cff in July, the 777 gallons reported being the smallest for any month since 
February. Total imports for the first 7 months of the year, at 6,832 gallons 
represent an average monthly import of less than 1,000 gallons from Canada. 
About 200 additional gallons have been entered from other countries. Total 
imports still represent less than one-half of 1 percent of the low duty 
quota for the year. 

Other concession items, the July imports of which were under June 
figures but larger than in July 1935, include dressed poultry, horses, and 
maple sugar. Imports of live poultry in July exceeded the June figures, 
as did those for hay. These two items also bulked larger than in July of 
last year. Eggs in the shell, however, dropped sharply below figures for 
the two comparable periods, while imports of turnips registered zero for 
July in both 1935 and 1936. 

CREAM: Imports into the United States from Canada, and total imports, 



by months, 1935 and 1936 



Month 


1935 : 


1936 


Canada 


Total 


Canada 


Total 




Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 




4 


4 ' 


10 1 


10 




• 34 


34 


246 


248 




45 


79 


1,035 


1,035 


April . 


36 


76 


2,012 


2,043 




45 


142 


1,620 


1,761 




63 


125 


1,132 


1,136 




14 


14 


777 


; 789 




241 


474 


6,832 


7,022 



September 21, 1936 Foreign. Crops and Markets 355 

PROGRESS 0? AGRICtJDTlJRAL TRADE WITH. CANADA, CONT'D 



CATTLE: Imports into the United States from Canada and Mexico, 
by months , 1935 and 1936 





700 


pounds and over 


Under 


700 -pounds 


1 r Po+: a1 








iLess than 


: 175 to 




year, and 


• Dairy 


j Others 


j Total 


; 175 


' COO 

• 699 


; Total 


! dutiable 


TTVfYrt "hVl 

lUKJli. Oil 


« cows 


; pounds 


: pounds 




1 fiattl e 




: Number 


• Number 


• Number 


j Nuraber 


: Number 


■' Number 


Number 


CANADA: 
















19 35- J anuary .... 


■• a/ 


! / 
; a/ 


■ 1,274 


a/ 


a/ 


: 173 


1,447 


February . . . 


! a/ 


a/ 


j 3,502 


i a/ 


■ a/ 


: 677 


4,179 


March 


! a/ 


a/ 


: 11,390 


: a/ 


• — / 

; &l. 


; 4,381 


15,771 


April 


i a/ 


a/ 


i 13,487 


: a/ 


■ sJ 


; 5 , 443 


18,930 


May 


i a/ 




! 14,142 


4 1 

a/ 


i 1 


: 6,611 


20 , 753 


June 




a/ 


6,460 


a/ 


4, boo 


11 , 318 


July 


a/ 


: a/ 


* n / 07 

< e,4oo 


; a/ 


a/ 


O , D ( O 


6,153 


Total .... 


a/ 


; a/ 


. 52 , (60 


: a/ 


a/ , 


. <3o,oio 


78, 551 


*iy 3b- January • . . . 


290 




: 0. 0 ca 


| 896 


: 0 'z 0 
: doc 


: i 

; 1 , < co 


10, 592 


.February . . . 


181 


; O , boo 


Q Q C/1 

; 0,0 Ctffc 


: 1,230 


: out? 


; 1 , f oi? ; 


10 , 603 


March 


200 


1 "1/1 C 

. 14 , b <jb 


' I/O 00 
■ 14,0<S0 


: 2,141 


; vdo 


; 0, UbJ. 


17, 897 


April 


326 


■ 34,D01 


; 34 , 82 r 


\ 6,425 


' T OCA 

; 3,250 


; y , b rD. 


44, 502 


May 


920 


■ 2o, /31 


; 24 , box 


\ 9 , 054 


2,32y 


' "1 "1 rr Q r7 

< 11 , 3o3. 


36,034 


June 


764 


: 20,738 


j 21 , 502 


: 14,337 


j 2,548 


j 16,885; 


38,387 


July ... 


564 


; 8,605 


1 Q T CO 

y , ±by 


i 14,198 




. lb , oU4t.i 


25,773 


Total .... 


3,245 


' 119.460 


122.705 


: 48,281 


: 12,802 


61 ,083. 


183,788 


MEXICO: 
















19 35- January .... 


a/ 


a/ 


c 0 

68 


a/ 


„ / 


/I r-7-1 r-7 * 

4, 313; 


4,381 


February . . . 




a/ 


22 


a/ 


X a/ 


33 , 536 j 


33,558 


March 


a/ 


a/ 


62 


a/ 


/ 

: a/ / 


' 36,088j 


36,150 


April 


a/ 


a/ 


770 


a/ 




29 733." 


30,503 


ivi clj/ • 


„ / 


a/ 


242 


a/ 


i a/ 


26,062 : 


/dO , ob"± 


June 


I 


a/ 


946 


a/ 


' a/ 


19,581: 


20,527 


July 


-4- 


a/ 


194 




-4- 


10, 652: 


10,846 


Total : 


a/ 


a/ 


2,304 


a/ 


a/ 


159,965i 


162,269 


193&- January .... : 


0 


2,319* 


2,319' 


161 


8,338 


8,499: 


10,818 


February ... • 


0 


3,301. 


3,301. 


32 


13,819 


13,851: 


17,152 


March j 


0 ; 


5,855 


5,855: 


33 


27,195; 


27,228 : 


33,083 


April • 


0 : 


3,191: 


3,191: 


259 


30,372: 


30,621; 


33,822 


May j 


^ : 


4,027: 


4,027;* 


128 


14,727: 


14,855: 


18,882 


June • 


0 : 


666- 


666j 


12 : 


7,096: 


7,108;' 


7,774 


July j 


0 : 


1,306;' 


l,306i 


881 i 


5,346, : 


6,227.: 


7,533 


Total .... ; 


0 ■ 


20,665: 


20,665; 


1,506 i 


106,893: 


108 , 399:' 


129,064 



a/ Not classified prior to January 1, 1936. 



356 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 12 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 

CHEDDAR CHEESE: United States production, and imports from Canada, 
"by months, average 1925-192.9-, annual 1935 and 1936 



Average 1925-1929 

— — =°i 



1935 



,193c 









Percent j 






Percent ! 






Percent 






Imports 


Imports '• 


Pro- 


Imports 


imports : 


Pro- 


Imports 


imports 


Month. 


rro~ 


from 


are of :duction 


from 


are of : 


ductior 


from 


are of 




ducti or 


Canada 


pro— : 


W 


Canada 


pro- ; 


, / 

m 


Canada 


pro- 






„ / 
a-/ 


duct ion ; 




/ 

ay 


duction ; 






duction 




1 , UUU 


X't 000 




,.,000 


1, 000 


1 


i, 000 


1, 000 






pounds 


pounds 


Percent j 


pounds 


pounds 


Percent 


pounds 


pounds 


Percent 


Jan . 


18,190 


467 


2.57 


22,181 


150 


0.68 


29,730 


707 


2.38 


Feb . 


18,717 


284 


1.53 


21,113 


49 


.23 


26,139 


605 


2.31 


Mar . 


23,128 


337 


1.46 


24,594 


103 


.42 


29,733 


1,526 


5 . 13 


Apr. 


27,809 


328 


1.18 


30,573 


47 


.15 


34,656 


373 


1.08 


May 


38,224 


424 


l.ii 


44, 934 


66 


.1$ 


48,320 


122 


0.25 


June 


46,051 


756 


1.64 


55,607 


63 


.11 
.07 


64,016 


493 


0.77 


July 


42, 029 


742 


1.77 


54,293 


36 


50,796 


1,814 


3.57 


Aug. 


34,976 


595 


1.7Cj 


51,493 


55 


.11 








Sept . 


29,461 


509 


1.73; 


47,448 


24 


.05 








Oct. 


25,105 


1,159 


4.62; 


41,156 


61 


.13 








Nov. 


18,224 


1 , 342 


7.36 


27,598 


82 


.30 








Dec . 


17,375 


1,273 


7.33 


26,918 


33 


.12 








Total 


339,299 


3 , 216 j 


2.42 448,013 


769 


.11 







aj Mostly cheddar cheese. *bj Preliminary. 

POTATOES: Imports into the United States from Canada and total imports, 

"by months, 1934—35 and 1935-36 







1934 


-35 




1935-36 


Month 


Certified seed 


Tot 


al 


Certified seed 


Tot: 


l1 


potatoes 


potatoes 


potatoes a/ 


potatoes 




Canada 


Total 


Canada 


Total 


Canada. 


Total 


Canada 


Total 




Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 




Bushels 






Dec. 


3 , 792 


1 3,792 


35,897 


37,634 


25,518 


25,618 


33,797 


41,750 


Jan . 


0 


0 


28,5:.; 


37,299 


20,634 


20,634 


30,306 


35 , 227 


Feb. 


14,650 


14,650 


33,941 


40,986 


7,036 


7,036 


15,237 


30,621 


Mar . 


14,893 


14,893 


46,756 


48,497 


188,919 


188,919 


190,682 


205,862 


Apr. 


6 , 017 


6,017 


29,488 


61,431 


135,600 


135,600 


174,449 


190,352 


May 


10,252 


10,252 


104,022 


105,319 


19,964 


19,964 


65,878 


57,044 


June 


2,444 


2,444 


5,715 


5,715 


16,633 


16 , 648 


217,481 


225,008 


July 


0 


0 


146 


192 


25 


25 


59,937 


50,246 


Total 


52,048 


52,048 


284,497 


338,573 


414,429 


414,444 


787,767 


857,110 



aj The quota year "begins December 1. 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

. PROGRESS OP AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 



357 



UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada of agricultural commodities on which 
duties were reduced, January- July , 1935 and 1936 



Coinmodi ty 









January - 


-July 




Unit 




■ Quan 


tity 


; Value 






; 1935 


; 1936 


: 1935 


; 1935 










• 1,000 


; 1,000 










■dollars 


^dollars 


Head . 




: 105 


1 205 


; 49 


! - 53 


Thousand 


lb. 


: 8 


: 23 


: 4 


: 11 










• 199 


: 230 










252 


: 294 


Thousand 


lb. 


j 387 


! 1,538 


1 42 


• 180 


Thousand 


lb. 


■ 107 


■ 348 


i 26 


; 70 


Thousand 


lb. 


: 27 


: 78 


: 4 


: 9 


Thousand 


lb. 


: 4 


: 92 


■ 1 


: 32 


Thousand 


lb. 


• 303 


: 23 


;'■ 40 


: 3 


Thousand 


lb. 


j 203 


: 288 


! 44 


: 43 


Thousand 


lb. 


i 1,031 


2,367 


157 


337 


Thousand 


lb. 


: 517 


1,065 


64 


123 


Thousand 


lb. 


■ 573 


481 


167 


82 


Thousand 


doz. 


: 1 5 


99 


9 


33 










6 


19 










246 


257 


Thousand 


bu. 


a/ 108 


aj 371 


214 


337 


Thousand 


lb. 


6, 663 


2,975 


232., 


99 


Thousand 


bu. 


b/ 11 


b/ 40 


18' 


56 


Thousand 


lb. 


649 


725 


59 


72 


Thousand 


lb. 


4,215 


4,767 


95 


85 










94 


250 










722 


899 


Million lb. 


10 


11 


133 j 


269 










2,215 : 


2,811 










53 i 


77 










63 : 


62 










83 ; 


92- 










2,547 : 


3,311 



Animals - 

Horses , 

' Live poultry , . , 

Other 

Total animals 



Meats - 

Pork, pickled or salted 
Hams and shoulders 
Bacon and sides 
Pork, canned . . . 
Fork, fresh .... 
Other meats .... 
Total meats . . 



Other animal products - 
La.rd (including neutral 

lard) 

Sausage causing s 

Eggs in the shell 

Miscellaneous 

Total animal products 



Grains : and- grain products - 
Corn and cornmeal. . . . 

Rice, cleaned 

Whea,t and wheat flour 
Biscuits, unsweetened 
Hominy and corn grits 

Others 

Total grains and 
grain products .. 



Vegetables and preparations-^ 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetable 
Canned vegetables. . . . 
Dried, vegetables .... 
Vegetable preparations. 
Total vegetables and 
preparations 



Continued - 



358 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 12 



PROGRESS OF AGRI CULTURAL TRADE WITH CM ADA, CONT'D 

UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada of agricultural commodities on which 
duties were reduced, January-July , 1935 and 1936, cont'd 



January- July 



Commodity. 


; Unit 




• Quantity 


Value 


i , , 






1 9^6 


1 9^5 


1 9^6 












' i ooo 


' 1 000 




■ . . . 










U_U_LJ_ciI 0 


Fruits and preparations - 


• 












Orange s , f re sh . .. i ........ . 


: Thousand 


"box 


\ 1,526 


1,699 


• 3,792 


4,235 




:- Thousand 


box 


; 328 


: 362 


■ 557 


733 




: Thousand 


lb. 


■ C / tz, , DUO 


n / P, 

C / D , OD<7 


■ 33 


• X O^i 




: Thousand 


lb. 


1 Q'ZA 
X , ao^i 




' Q'X 

■ C7 0 


1 Q9 
■ 120 












1,UD( 


X , ODD 




j Thousand 


lb. 


' 179 


188 


12 


14 




; Thousand 


lb. 


986 


1,005 


1 . 69 


80 




: Thousand 


lb. 


312 


738 


39 


77 


Other dried and evaporated 
















: Thousand 


lb. 


417 


780 




42 




Thousand 


lb. 




1 0 


d/ 
)±i 


7 




Thousand 


lb. 


86 


87 


7 


6 




Thousand 


lb. 


370 


l,-274 


31 


91 


Other canned and preserved 














fruit-.". . -. • • • 


Thousand 


lb. 


842 


1,002 


82 


98 


Total fruit and 
























5,831 


7,065 


Nuts - 
















Thousand 


lb. 


65 


661; 


31 


158 




Thousand 


lb. ' 


190 


105 


. . . .59 


28 




Thousand 


lb. 


255 


766 


90 


186 




'Thousand 


gal.i 


188 


266; 


35, 


38 




Thousand 


gal.i 


33 


18' 


7 


7 




Thousand 


lb. : 


86 


86 


6. 


6 




Thousand 


gal.i 


156 


380; 


124 


273 


Field and garden seeds 


Thousand 


lb. \ 


1,043 


2,956; 


182i 


254 


Nursery and greenhouse stock 










125! 


180 












15: 


13 












10 , 339; 


13,120 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Cornmeal converted at the rate of 4 bushel s :> of • corn to 1 barrel of meal, 
b/ Wheat flour converted at the rate of 4.7 bushels of wheat to 1 barrel of 
flour, c/ Apples converted at the following rates: 48 pounds to 1 bushel 
basket, 44 pounds to 1 box, 140 pounds to 1 barrel, d/ Less than $500. 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 359 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE T7ITK CANADA, CONT'D 



UNITED STATES: Imports from Canada of agricultural commodities on which 
duties were reduced, January-July, 1935 and 1936 













Janua 


ry-July 






Commodity 




Unit 




Quant i ty 




Value 












1 9^5 


I 1 9^6 


\ 1935 


: 1936 
















000 


; 1 


,000 














! dollars 


: dollars 


Cattle - 




















Weighing less than 700 lb. 


a/ 


Thous and 


head 


\ 26 


61 




891 




985 


Weighing 700 lb . or over , , . 




Thousand 


head 


: 53 


123 


: 3 


,278 




6,418 






Thousand 


head 


79 


: 184 


: 4 


,169 


- 7,403 


Poultry - 
























Thousand 


lb. 


i 5 


: 496 




3 




78 


Dead b/ 




Thousand 


lb. 


c/ 


i 138 


Ui 






33 






Thous and 


lb. 


5 


634 


: 3 


111 


Horses worth not over $150 ee 


.ch. 


Thousand 


head 


4 


14 




448 




1,658 


Non-specified cheese: 
























Thousand 


lb. 




; 5,640 








733 






Thousand 


lb. 


el 




J 




f/ 


38 




Thousand 


lb. 


514 


5 824 


56 


771 






Gallons 




241 


i 4 01-^ 


d 






0 
•j 


Cereal breakfast foods 


m ■ • 


Thous and 


lb. 


212 


431 




23 




38 






Thousand 


ton 


gj 18 


5 


d 


163 




39 






Thousand 


bu. 


7(^5 

1 UJ 


*-x±. 




308 




14 


Vegetables - 
























Million lb . 








236 




365 






Million lb. 


6 


23 




27 




322 






Thousand 


lb. 


53 


0 




3 




0 










266 


687 


Fruits - 
























Thousand 


lb . 


900 


450 




41 




22 






Bushels 




3 


8 


0/ 












Thousand 


lb. ' 


55 


727 




6 ■ 




65 








47 


87 


Grass and other forage seeds 
























Thousand 


lb. 


1,974 


' 2: 




357: 










Thousand 


lb. 


89 


94 




ll! 




7 






Thousand 


lb. 


46 


767 




9; 




38 


Total grass and other 




















Thousand 


lb. 


2,109 


863 ; 




377' 








Thousand 

1 ■ 


lb. 


1.090 


... 3,407; 


161 


547 








6 


031: 


11,409 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and 'Domestic Commerce. 



See footnotes on following page. 



360 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 12 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE 171 TH CANADA, CONT'D 

UNITED STATES: Imports from Canada of agricultural commodities on which 
duties were reduced, January- July, 1935 and 1936, cont'd 

a/ Cattle weighing less than 175 pounds per head were affected by the United 

States -Canadian Trade Agreement. However, this item is not separately 

classified in United States import statistics prior to 1936. 

b/ Does not include poultry imported. free for use on American vessels, which 

amounted to 51,498 pounds, valued at $10,029, in 1935; and 561 pounds, valued 

at $105, in 1936. 

c/ Less than 500. 

d/ Included in "Other" cheese prior to January 1, 1936. 

ey Excludes Swiss, Romano, Reggiano, Provoloni,- and Roquefort. 

fj Excludes Swiss, Gruyere, Romano, Reggiano, Provoloni, Roquefort, Edam, 

and blue-mold. 

g/ Does not include 47,799 tons, valued- at $489,213, imported free by special 
administrative order during the drought months of 1935. 

h/ The duty on "Oats, hulled, unfit for human consumption" was reduced under 
the United States -Canadian Agreement. Imports of this commodity were not re- 
ported separately prior to January 1, 1936. During the first 7 months of 
1936 they formed 49 percent by value and 33 percent by volume' of total oats 
as shown. 



UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada, by months, January-July, 

1935 and 1936 



Item and month 


: 1935 


i ' 1936 


Increase or decrease 






; Amount 


; Percentage. 




Thousand 


; Thousand 


Thousand 






• dollars 


j dollars 


: dollars.— 


; P_£X££Jut. 


All commodities - 










J anuary 


| 21,624 


1 25,728 


: +4,104 


: +19 


February 


1 21,958 


: 23, 887 


'; ' +1,929 


: ' +9 


March 


24,210 


; ' 26,310 


j +2,1.00 


;' +9 


Apr i 1 


27,478 


30,230 


; +2,752 


: +io 


May. 


29,273 


: 35,279 


+ 6,006 


: . +21 


June 


26,532 


33,5-11' 


' ' ' +6,979 


' ' . +26 


July 


27,124 


29 . 961' 


!' -4- 2 . 837 


J- 10 


First 7 months. . 


178.199 


■ 204. 906 


+26.707 


+ 15 


Non-agricultural - 










J anuary 


17,603 


21,999 


'• ' '+4,396 


+ 25 


February 


19,125 


20,418 


+1,293 


+ 7 


March 


21,015 


22,001 


; + 986 


+ 5 j 


Apri 1 4 


23,809 


26,303 


: ' +2,494 


+10 


May 


25,626 


30,479 


j +4,853 


+19 


J une 


23,352 


28,337 


' +4,985 


+21 


July 


23,122 [ 


25,945" 


+2,823 


+12 


First 7 months ; 


153,652 , ; 


175,482 . 


+ 21,830, 


+ 14 



Continued - 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 361 

I 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 



UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada by months, January- July, 

1935 and 1936 



T "h P,"D in T\c\ ifrnn "hVi 




1°K6 


Increase or decrease 


Amount 


Percentage 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




Agricultural - 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


Percent 


January 


4,021 


3,729 


-292 


-7 


February 


2,833 


3,469 


+ 636 


+ 22 


March - 


3,195 


4,309 


+1,114 


+35 


April 


3, 669 


. a, 927 


+ 258 


+ 7 


May 


. . 3,647 


4,800 


+1 1 53 

X , Xw w 


+32 


June 


3,180 


5,174 


, "i OQ/1 

+1 , yy^t 


+ oo 


July 


4,002 


4.016 


xl4 


x0.3 


First 7 months 


24.547 


29.424 


+4, 877 


+20 


Agricultural on which duties we: _■ 










reduced under the agreement - 










January 


959 


1,325 


+366 


+38 


February 


1,161 


1,241 


+80 


+ 7 


March 


1,431 


1,386 


+455 


+32 


April 


1,659 


2,201 


+ 542 


+33 


May 


2,066 


1,853 


21 3 


-10 


June 


1,615 


2,475 


+860 


+53 


July 


1.448 


2,139 


+ 691 


+48 


First 7 months 


10,339 


13,120 


+2,781 


+27 


Other agricultural - 










Ja.nue.ry 


3,062 


2,404 


-658 


. -21 


February 


1,672 


2,228 


+556 


+33 


March : 


. . .1,764 


2,423'.' 


+ 659 


+37 


April 


2,010 


1,726 


-284 


-14 


May 


1,581 


2,947 


+1,366 


+86 


June 


1,565 


2,699 


+1 , 134 


+72 


July j 


2,554 


1,877 


-677 


-27 


First 7 months : 


14,208 


16,304 


+2,096 


+15 



UNITED STATES: Imports from Canada, by months, January-July, 

1935-and 1936 



Item and month 


1935 


1936 


Increase or decrease 


Amount 


Percentage 




Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 




commodities - 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


Percent 


January 


19 , 235 


24,276 


+5 , 041 


+26 


February 


18,142 


22,928 


+4,786 


+26 


March 


20,877 


26,835 


+5,958 


+29 


April 


22,353 


26,710 


. +4,357 


+19 


May 


27,024 


28 , 743 


+1,719 


+ c 


June 


22,313 < 


30,347 


+8 , 034 


+36 


July 


23,726 


30,715 


+6,989 


+29 


First 7 months 


153,670 


190,554 


+36,884 


+24 



Continued 



362 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, ITo . 12 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CAM ADA, CONT'D 



UNITED STATES 



Imports from Canada, by months, January-July, 
1935 and 1936, cont'd 



Item and month 



1935 



1936 



Increase or decrea se 
Amount . P ercenta ge 



Non- agricultural - 
January 
February 
March , 
April , 
May . . 
June . 
July . 

First 7 months 
Agricultural a/ - 
J anuary 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June 
July 

First 7 months 
Agricultural on which duties were 
reduced under the agreement - 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June 
July 

First 7 months 
Other agricultural - 
J anuary 
February 
March 
April 
May . . 
June , 
July , 

First 7 m onths 



Thousand 
dollars 



15,379 
14,153 
16,253 
16,288 
20,750 
18,225 
18,869 



119,917 



3,856 
3,989 
4,624 
6,065 
6,274 
4,088 
4,857 



33,753 



415 
568 
1,154 
1,453 
1,433 
650 
358 



6,031 



3,441 
3,421 
3,470 
4,612 
4,841 
3,438 
4,499 



27,722 



Thousand 
dollars 
19,074 
17,535 
20,507 
20,177 
22,922 
23,670 
20,880 



Thousand 
dollars 



+3,695 
+3,382 
+4,254 
+3,889 
+2,172 
+5,445 
+2,01 1 



144,765 



+24,848 



5,202 
5,393 
6,328 
6,533 
5,821 
6,677 
9,835 



+1,346 
+1 , 404 
+1 , 704 
+468 
. -453 
+2,589 
+4,978 



45,789 



+12,036 



953 
1,067 
1,745 
2,728 
1,971 
1,745 
1,200 



+538 
+499 
+591 

+1,275 
+538 

+1,095 
+842 



11 , 409 



+5,378 



4,249 
4,326 
4,583 
3,805 
3,850 
4,932 
8 , 635 



+808 
+905 
+1,113 
-807 
-991 
+1,494 
+4,136 



34 , 380 



+6,658 



Compiled from official records of 
a/ Does not include distilled spi 



the Bureau of 
rits . 



Foreign and Domestic Commerce , 



September 21, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of December futures 



363 



Date 


Chicago 


■Kansas City 


; Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a, 


/ Buenos 
Aires b/ 




"1 0*7^ 

li)6u 


193b 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


193*0 


iy35 




High c/. ... 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


96 


114 


98 


115 


114 


128 


90 


106 


90 


115 


d/ 74 


a/117 


Low c / . . . . 


82 


98 


78 


94 


83 


108 


82 


84 


70 


• • 89 


a/ 56 


a/ 92 


Aug . 22 . . . 


91 


112 


92 


113 


106 


124 


85 


98 


81 


109 


e/ 64 


e/l05 


29. . . . 


90; 


109 


92 


109 


108 


122 


82 


95 


80 


105 


e/ 64 
e/ 66 


e/100 


Sept . 5 . . 


94. 


110 


97 


110 


114 


123 


89 


97 


85 


111 


e/100 
e/ 99 


12. . 


94' 


112 


98 


111' 


112 


124 


90 


101 


90 


115 


e/ 74 



a/ Conversions at noon 
other prices, c/ July 
Nov. futures 1935, Sept 



buying rate of exchange, b/ Prices 
1 to aate, Winnipeg, Aug. 16 to aate 
., Oct., ana Nov. futures, 1936. e/ 



are of aay previous to 
in 1935. a/ Oct. ana 
Nov. futures. 



WHEAT: Weekly weightea average cash price at statea markets 





All classes 


No 


. 2 


No 


. 1 


No. 


2 Hard 


No. 


2 


Western 


Week 


and grades 


Hard Winter 


Dk .N. Spring 


Amber 


Durum 


Red Winter 


: White 


enaed 


six markets 


Kansa.s City 


Minneapolis 


Minneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1935 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


High of ... 


101 


128 


' 113 


126 


131 


150 


120 


166 


98 


120 


78 


100 


Low bj. . . . 


93 


99 


93 


100 


109 


124 


101 


125 


85 


96 


74 


82 


Aug . 22 . . . 


97 


127 


103 


126 


127 


144 


118 


144 


93 


120 


76 


100 


29. . . 


100 


121 


107 


120 


129 


143 


113 


143 


91 


117 


74 


96 


Sept . 5 . . 


98 


119 


112 


119 


129 


140 


108 


120 


93 


114 


75 


93 


T 12. .. 


101 


122 


113 


123 


131 


• 143 


112 


140 


98 


116 


76 





a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sacked, b/ July 1 to date 



WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-36 and 1936-37 



Date 


Range 


Hara 
Winter 


Manitoba 
No. 3 


Si U.CUU. 

Argentina 
a/ 


Australia 


Berlin 

sJ 


Paris 


ana 
Wales 






No. 2 




Domestic 








Cents 


Cents 


Gents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


1935-36d/ 


High 


87 


93 


75 


81 


229 


150 


74 


1936-37a/ 


Low 


74 


82 


63 


71 


209 


121 


. 59 


High 


■ 120 


119 


118 


120 


233 


204 


109 




Low 


101 


99 


M,<-99 


100 


209 


177 


91 


July 30. 




ej 111 


108 


108 


109 


232 


201 


98 


Aug . 5 . 




ej 120 


119 


118 


120 


232. 


204 


101 


12. 




e/ 115 
e/ 113 


114 


113 


120 


232 




104 


19. 




113 : 


111 


118 


209 




109 


26. 




e/ 106 


107 


105 


116 


209 




104 



Prices at Paris are of aay previous to other prices. Prices in England ana Wales 
are for week enaing Saturday. Conversions made at current exchange rates, 
a/ Barusso. b/ E.A.Q,. c/ Producer's fixed price from August 16, 1934. d/ July I 
to date . e_/ Nominal . 



364 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 12 



FEED GRAINS AMD RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
, oats, and Parley at l e ading markets &J 









Corn 






1 Rye 


Oats 


"Rr.rl.fiy 


TTeek 




Chic 


ago 




iBuenos Aires 


>; Minneapolis 


' Chicago 


Minneapolis 


ended 


; Ko. 3 : 
Yellow i 


Future s 


Future s 


No. 


2 


j Ko . 
: tfhi 


, 3 

te, 


No • 


2 




:i935 


1936 ; 


1935 


; 1935 


1935 


1936 


1935: 


1936 


1935 


1935 


1935 


: 1936 




•Cents 


Cents 1 


Cent 


3 Cents' 


.Cent? 


s Hp.nt.c 


(tent*. 


Cents 


Cents 




, rifmtii 


5 ftents 


High b/. . 


I 96 


118i 


57 


99 : 


39 


56 


so: 


86 


58 


46 


113 


129 


Low p_/. . . 


■ .76 


5S) 


55 
Dec . 


94 j 

Dec. : 


37 
Oct. 


47 
Oct. 


42: 


48 


27 


25 


41 


58 


Aug. 15. . . 


; 85 


. 110 


56 


95 : 


37 
Uov . 


53 
Kov- 


44; 


80 


28 


44 


52 


125 


22. . . 


80 


118 


56; 


99 ! 


38 


56 


45 i 


84 


28 


46 


51 


128 


29. . . 


: 76 


114 


57; 


95; 


37 


54 


45; 


82 ■ 


27 


45 


67 


129 


Sept . 5. . . 
12. . . 


; 77 
82 


lOSj 
114 


56 i 

57-' 


94 ; 
95: 


38 
39 


53 
54 


44- 
45 


82: 
86 : 


28 
30 


43 
43 


64 
53 


126 
129 



sj Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations. ~bj For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 



Exports 
; for year 


; Shipments 1936, 
; week ended a/ 


I Exports as far 
: as reported 


; 1934-35 


1935-3 


? Aug. 29 


Sept . 5 


[Sept .12 


-July 1 

; to 


1935-36 
k/ 


1^66-6/ 

. 5/ 


: 1,000 
; "bushels 


1,000 
"bushels 


1,000 
"bushels 


1,000 
"bushels 


. 1,000 
' "bushels 


Sept. 12 
July 31 
Sept . 5 
Sept. 12 


1,000 
. "bushels 


; 1,000 
jbushels 


[ 

: 4,050 
1 14,453 
20,739 
Rll,250 


9,886 
6,882 
9,468 
37,375 


262 
0 

512 


605 

167 
1.114 


265 
1,279 


2,230 
■ 1,098 
1,147 
12.135 


2,599 
1,892 
1,092 
4.811 


50,492 


63,611 










15,511 


10,394.. 


1,147 
' 17,407 
43,753 
R.8.444 


1,429 
14,892 
9,790 
,2,847 


0 

7 
40 


1 

48 
0 


0 

0 

o 


Sept .12 
July 31 
Sept. 12 
Snpt.lP 


161 
1,442 
4,275 

30 


9 

1,771 
1,082 
170 


• 70,751 


28,958 










R POP. 


3 032 


:1933-34 


1934-35 


0 

434 
6,067 
188 


0 
25 
7,067 
9 


3 

587 
7,379 

26 


Nov. 1 to 


1934-35 


1935-36 


: 4,382 
R23.134 
228,864 

i 8,583 


880 
15,857 
255,143' 
21,882 


Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 


674 
15,696 : 
214,037. 
18,016. 


763 
14,053 
237,238 
7,279 


265 T 413 


294.762 










248,423: 


259,333 


1,362 


41,141- 








July 31 


24, 911 ' 


10,706 



BARLEY, EXPORT'S: c 

United States . . . 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube and U.S.S 

Total 

OATS, EXPORTS: cj 

United States. 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube and U.S 

Total 

C«RN, EXPORTS: 

United States. 
Danube and U.S 

Argentina 

South Africa. . 
Total 
United States 
imports 



S 



Compiled from official and trade sources. sj The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, oj Year beginning July 1. &/ Year 
beginning November 1. 



September 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



365 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 
September 11, 1936, with comparisons 



1936 





\ July 




August 




September 




24 


31 


7 


1 A 

14 ■ 


21 




A 
*± 


±1 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


American - 




















15.32 
14.06 


j 14.83 
. 13.58 


14.69 
13.43 


14.49 
13. 24 


14.13 
12.87 




14.06 


' 14.75 


Low Middling 


12.78 


n o Q"l 






















Sakellaridis 


22.86 


23.46 




23.06 


21.68 




21.64 


22.66 




18.10 


18,70 


17.49 


17.05 


16.77 


16.47 


15.78 


16.10 


Brazilian (Fair) - 


Sao Paulo 


13.75 
14.27 


13.48 
14.00 


13.12 
13.64 


13.03 
13.55 


12.77 
13.29 


12.68 
13.20 


12.80 

13.33 


13.59 
14.12 


East Indian - 


















Broach (Fully good) 


11.85 


11.64 


11.48 


11.35 


11.09 


11.17 


11.29 


11.88 


Oi P. Oomra, No . 1, superfine . 


12.33 


12.12 


11.97 


11,83 


11 „ 61 


11.50 


11 . 63 


12.22 




10.15 


10.11 


10.06 


9.93 


9.87 


9.97 


10.10 


11.98 


Peruvian (Good) 


T&nguis 


17.51 


17.13 


16.99 


16.90 


16.65. 


16.55 


16.48; 





Converted at current exchange rate. 



URUGUAY: 


Animal s 


slaughtere 


d, January 


-July, 1935 and 1936 


Month 


Cat 


tie 


Sheep and lambs 


Ho 


gs 




1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


January 


96,555 


80,893 


139,101 


161,675 


3,607 


3,398 


February 


85,195 


89,290 


101,783 


153,961 


2,735 


3,410 


March 


108,722 


104,586 


43,447 


39,627 


3,479 


4,096 


April 


107,907 


93,077 


25 , 524 


10,595 


3,827 


4,378 


May . . . . 


108,062 


76,158 


12,871 


6,205 


5,050 


• 4,936 


June 


92,892 


67,830 


7,434 


10,129 


5,514 


6,451 


July 


74.174 


58 . 279 


.1,727 


7,914 


6,675 


7,938 


Total 


673,507 


570,113 


331,887 


390,106 


30,887 


34, 607 



American Consulate General, Montevideo, Uruguay. 



366 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol* 33, llo. 12 



GRAINS: Exports from the United States, July 1-Sept. 12, 1935 and 1936 
PORK: Exports from the United States, Jan. 1-Sept. 12, 1935 and 1936 



u uiii.-nuLLi x>y 


: July 1- 


3eiot. 12 




T'eek 


ended 




: 1935 


: .1936 


Aug. 22 


Aug. 29 


Sent. 5 


Sept. 12 




1,000 


: 1,000 


1, 000 


1,000 ■ 


1,000 ' 


: 1,000 




"bushels 


: bushels 


"bushels 


: "bushels: 


"bushels 


"bushel s 


GRAINS: 














Wheat a/ 


: 84: 315 


23 


154 


: 111 


0 


Wheat -PI bur ~b] 


: . 2,660 


: 2,218 


132 


122 


164 


207 




2,230 


: 2,599 


446 


262' 


605 


265 




55 


: 127 


o 


0 


0 


3 




121 


9 


o 


o 


1 


0 


Rye: . . 


2 


0 


0 


0 


0 


r\ 
\J 




Jan. 1 - 


- Sept. 12 












1, 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




mounds 


■oounds 


pounds 


pounds 


nounds 


pounds 


PORK: : 












Hams and shoulders ... : 


42, 404 


31, 405 


672 


485: 


328 


319 


Bacon, including sides . 


5,278 


4,585 


605 


714 


189 


45 




6, 272 


6, 861- 


146. 


153 


171 


76 


Lard, excluding neutral: 


' 78,145 


75, 430. 


1, 406 


766 


2, 288 


. 1,242 



Official records, Bureau of Eoreign and Domestic Commerce, a/ Included this 
week: pacific ports, wheat, none-; flour 29,900 barrels, from San Francisco; 
barley 265,000 bushels; rice 1,572,000 pounds, b/ Includes flour milled in bond 
from Canadian wheat, in terms of wheat. 



WHEAT, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sources, 1933-34 to 1936-37 



Country 


: Total 
: shipments 


: Shii 


uments 1936 
veek ended 


: Shipments 
.July 1- Seiot.12 


•1933-34 


: 1934-35 


Aug. 29 


Sept . 5 


: Sept. 12 


1935-36:1936-37 


Canada, 4 markets b/.. 


1 , 000 
bushels 


1,000 : 
bushels 


1,000 
: bushels 


1,000 
bushel s 


: 1,000 
: bushels 


: 1,.000 : 1,000 
bu she Is : bu sh e 1 s 


220, 616 
194,213 
37, 002 


168, 712 
176,059 
21,532: 


5,288 
3,791 
276 


3, 937 
5 , 350 
275 


: 4,677 
7,567- 

207 


26,112: 58,718 
75,088: 54,711 
2,744: 2,533 


Danube and Bulgaria &/ : 


140, 128 
90,736 
25, 656 
15, 872 

c/2, 084 


186, 228; 

111, 628: 
1,656 
4, 104 

c/2,318- 


620 
1, 192 

0 

1,808 

. 24 


808 
1, 356 
0 

1,336 
40 


1 , 333 : 
969: 
: 0 : 
3,552: 
72: 


27,480: 10,717 
15,892: 11,821 
4,562: 0 
1,640: 11,136 
0 : 608 


Total e/ : 


495,092 


474, 546. 








75,686: 93,000 


Total Ear ope an ship- 


401, 560 


387,752: 


6, 920: 






fj :f/ 
45,4,32: 55,272 


Total ex-Ear ope an ship-: 
merits a/ 


123, 352 


142, 424: 


2, 824. 






fj ~ :fj 
20,080: 26,112 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ Broomhall ' s Corn Trade News, 
b/ Fort William, port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Hex? Westminster, 
c/ Official. d/ Black Sea shipments only. e/ Total of trade fig-ores includes 
North America as reported by Broomhall. fj To Aug. 29. 



September 21, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



367 



EXCHANGE RATES: Average weekly and monthly values in New York of 
specified currencies) September 12, 1936, with comparisons a/ 







: M 


onth 


Week ended 




Monetary 


. ±yo4 


±yoo 


1936 


1936 


Country : 


unit 


i Aug. 


Aug. 


June 


July 


Aug, 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Sept . 












29 


5 


13 




- 


' Ton +• c 
1 well Li b 




Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Argentina. ; 


Paper peso 


. OO. ( ( 


oo . ±<d 


3o.42 


33 . 49 


33 . 50 


33. 54 


r-7 V? r- r- 

33. 55 


33. 70 


oanacta. • . . ; 


Dollar . . . 


lino rrp 

, XUiC » OO 


at) i fo 


99.72 


99*90 


99.98 


99.97 


99.98 


100.00 


PVl T Tin I 

omna, . . . . j 


Shang » yuan 


■ 34.86 


36.86 


29 . 89 


29. 97 


30. 05 


30.05 


30. 06 


30.07 


Denmark . . j 


Krone. .... 


' OO AO 

• CiCj . Old 


OO 1 D 


22.41 


22.42 


22.43 


22.45 


22.47 


22.57 


xjiigxanu., , ,, i 


Pound. .... 


:506.B1 


496.99 


d01. 92 


502. 25 


502.59 


503. 03 


503.42 


505 . 69 


France. . . . ■ 


Franc 


'< P, AA 
D. OO 


A ATI 
0, DO 


6.59 


6.62 


6.59 


6.58 


6.58 


6.58 


uci many • • • . 


Re i ch smark 


| 39.48 


40.35 


40.27 


40.32 


40.22 


•.40.i22 


40.22 


40.22 


Italy • 


Lira 


j 8. 66 


8.21 


■ 7.86 


7.8S 


7.87 


7.86 


7.87 


7.86 


Japan j 


Yen 


i 29,99 


29.32 


29.39 


29.33 


29.40 


29 . 44 


29.45 


29.57 


Mexico . . . . : 


Peso 


! 27.73 


27.75 


27.76 


27.76 


27.75 


27. 75 


27.75 


27.75 


Netherlands 


Guilder. . . . 


" 68.38 


67.78 


67.69 


68.08 


67.90 


67.90 


67.90 


67.79 


Norway. . . . ; 


Krone 


; 25.45 


24.95 


25.22 


25.23 


25.25 


25.27 


25.29 


25.40 




Peseta, 


j 13.80 


13.73 


13.66 


13.71 


13.64 


13.65 


13.65 


13.65 


Sweden. . . , j 


Krona. 


j 26.12 


25.62 


25.88 


25.89 


25.91 


25.93 


25.95 


26.06 


Switzerland 


Eranc. .... 


| 32.95 


32.82 


32.43 


32.72 


32.60 


32.60 


32.60 


32.56 


Eederal Res 


erve Board. 


a/ No 


on buyi 


ng rate 


s for c 


able tr 


ansf ers 


• 





LIVESTOCK AND MEAT : Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets. 
September 9, 1936, with comparisons a/ 



Market and item 



Week ended 



September 11; September 2, 
1935 : 1936 



September 9, 
1936 



Germany : 

Price of hogs, Berlin 

Price of lard, tcs. , Hamburg.. 
United Kingdom; b/ 
Prices at Liverpool 1st quality 

American green bellies 

Danish Wilt shire sides 

Canadian green sides 

American short cut green hams. 

American refined lard 



Dollars 

18.80 
19.16- 



Nominal 
18.73 
17.40 
23.13 
16.14 



Dollars 

17.70 
13.27 



17.30 
22.47 
20.56 
19.72 
13.67 



Dollars 

17.70 
13.31 



17.37 
22.55 
20.30 
19.45 
13.81 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sales from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted at current rate of exchange, b/ Week ended Friday. 



368 



Foreign Cro-os and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 12 



Index 



Page 

Late cables 340 

Cro'o and Market prospects 341 



AGRICULTURAL TRADE, UNITED STATES- 
CANADA, JANUARY- JULY , 1936 351 

Barley, prodaction, poland ; 

1935, 1936 340 

Butter: 

Grading s, New Zealand, Sept . 4, 1936 350 
prices, specified markets, 

Sept. 17, 1936 .' 349 

Cotton : 

Acreage, India, 1935,1936 344 

D el iv cries, Shanghai, 

October-August, 1935,1936 344 

Imports, China. October-August ' 

1935,1936 344 

Prices : 

China, Sept. 12, 1936 343 

United Kingdom, Sept. 11, 1936 365 

Production, China, 1935,1936 342 

Dairy products, export control 

New Zealand, Aug. 1, 1936 348 

Dates, production prospects, 

specified countries, 1936 345 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

Sept. 12, 1936 367 

Fats, supplies, Germany, 1936-37 .. 346 
Figs, production prospects, 

Smyrna, 1936 340 

Grains: 

Exports, U.S., Sept. 12, 1936 ... 366 
Mo v em en t (feed), pr in c ip al 

countries, Sept. 12, 1936 354 

Prices (feed), principal markets, 

Sept. 12, 1936 364 



Page 

Livestock (cattle), slaughter, Uruguay 

January-July, 1935,1336 347,365 

Meat (pork) : 

Exports, U.S., Sept. 12, 1936 ... 366 

Prices, foreign markets, 

Sept. 9, 1936 367 

Oats, production, Poland, 1935, 1936 340 
Potatoes, production, 

Poland, 1935,1936 340 

Raisins, production prospects, 

Smyrna, 1936 340 

Prices, U.S., Sept. 12, 1936 364 

Production: 

Poland, 1935,1936 340 

Specified countries, 1935,1936 341 
Wheat: 

Crop condition, Australia, 

Sept. 16, 1936 340 

Market condition,;, China, 

Sept. 11, 1936 -. 342 

Prices: 

Shanghai, Sept. 11, 1936 342 

Specified markets, 

Sept. 12, 1930 363 

Production, specified countries, 

1935,1936 341 

Shipments, principal countries, 

Sept. 12," 1936 366 

fool: 
Sales : 

Australia (Brisbane), 

Sept. 14, 1936 347 

London, Sept. 15, 1936 340,347 

Supply situation, U.K., 
August 1936 347